How to Make a Just Food Future: alternative foodways for a changing world

This 2.5-day interdisciplinary conference will take place at the University of Sheffield in July 2019.  It will bring together academics, practitioners and policymakers to reflect on the global issues facing food systems.  Drawing on ideas of social justice, ethics of care, political ecologies, translocality, the more-than-human and intersectionality to offer timely and innovative interventions it will develop spaces for collaboration and conversation in which to imagine socially just food futures and map out the personal and collective journeys that are needed to reach them.

Continue reading “How to Make a Just Food Future: alternative foodways for a changing world”
Advertisements
Featured post

Sponsored sessions at RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2019

The call for papers on Food Geographies Working Group sponsored sessions is now open. Here is an overview of all the session we are supporting at this year's conference. You will find more details on each call for papers by clicking on the title of the session. Any inquiries should be directed to responsible session conveners.  
Continue reading “Sponsored sessions at RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2019”
Featured post

From disruptive to emancipatory politics: transforming food governance

Session convenors:
Ana Moragues Faus, Cardiff University (MoraguesFausA1@cardiff.ac.uk)
Terry Marsden, Cardiff University (MarsdenTK@cardiff.ac.uk)

Current political events – from raise of nationalistic and populist movements to the growth of support for post-colonial, feminist and anti-austerity perspectives – present a rupture with managerial and the so-called post-democratic politics [1–3]. The food system embodies this highly politicised arena which, to date, still results in increasing levels of food poverty and health inequality, environmental degradation and increasing concentration of power [4–6]. For example in Europe, policy synergies between a private-interest governance regime and a corporatist EU state-based regulatory regime coexist with an ever-growing number of alternative food networks and food justice movements [7–9]. These fragmented governance landscapes require deeper examination to understand how current disruptive events – in the form of multiple crises, Brexit, social mobilisations or creative destruction events – can be harnessed into more emancipatory politics.

Continue reading “From disruptive to emancipatory politics: transforming food governance”

Is food sovereignty a feminist practice? Interrogating the gender dimensions of food sovereignty

Convenors
Annette Aurélie Desmarais, Canada Research Chair in Human Rights, Social Justice and Food Sovereignty, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Annette.desmarais@umanitoba.ca)
Rita Calvário, Center of Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal. (ritamcalvario@gmail.com)

Gender equality/equity is a critical element of the theory, discourse and practice of food sovereignty. Indeed, in this approach “women’s rights are non-negotiable” (Patel 2009). Yet, there is a considerable research gap on the gendered dimensions of food sovereignty (Agarwal 2014; Masson et al. 2017). This session will interrogate the role of food sovereignty in transforming social relations by analyzing if and how food sovereignty — as an on-going process of food system transformation (Schiavoni 2017) and feminist practice (Masson et al. 2017) — helps creates a “deep egalitarianism” (Menser 2008) that confronts unequal power relations, structures and processes, based on sex, race, patriarchy and class.

Continue reading “Is food sovereignty a feminist practice? Interrogating the gender dimensions of food sovereignty”

Transforming Agricultural Learning: from troubled pasts to pedagogies of hope

Session Conveners
Hannah Pitt (PittH2@cardiff.ac.uk)
Alice Taherzadeh (TaherzadehA@cardiff.ac.uk)
Sustainable Places Research Institute, Cardiff University.

Any hope of sustainable food futures requires suitable systems of education and training to support agricultural production. Traditional state-led agricultural extension has received declining public investment, and been criticised for failing to address the needs of sustainable, alternative, localised agricultural practices. The agricultural knowledge base in Europe is also troubled by an aging farmer population, and lack of new entrants. However, community food and farming models, organisations, and unions are attracting a new generation interested in sustainable production, and enhancing their knowledge through horizontal or place-based learning. Innovative pedagogical approaches include popular and political education, those inspired by indigenous cultures, use of online platforms and open-source knowledge models. These sessions focus on actors hoping for sustainable, just, regenerative agricultural practices, and their learning practices. We are interested in case studies and theoretical perspectives which shed light on the challenges around learning in the context of agricultural production, and potential solutions.

Continue reading “Transforming Agricultural Learning: from troubled pasts to pedagogies of hope”

Cultivating hope while getting into trouble with Community Food Initiatives

Session Convenors: 
Esther Veen (esther.veen@wur.nl)
Oona Morrow (oona.morrow@wur.nl),
Stefan Wahlen (stefan.wahlen@wur.nl)
Anke de Vrieze (anke.devrieze@wur.nl)

Community food initiatives (CFIs), such as community gardens or food waste initiatives, are often framed as hopeful solutions to our troubled food system. Yet the actual interrelations of hope and trouble are rarely interrogated in locally specific contexts. Hope and trouble are often employed in partial and limiting ways. CFIs are critiqued for being too hopeful, reproducing existing troubles (e.g. racism, power, privilege, and exclusion). Other readings strategically avoid the dominance of trouble, to leave space for hope and possibility. Neither approach is sufficient. Moreover, binary effects of hope and trouble can create methodological tensions that affect our own abilities to engage in action research that is both critical and reparative, hopeful and troubling.

Continue reading “Cultivating hope while getting into trouble with Community Food Initiatives”

Public food procurement – promoting population health, food security and ecosystem resilience.

Convenor
Mark Stein markstein2010@live.co.uk

Public food procurement is a significant part of overall food consumption in many countries – buying food for schools nurseries, hospitals and elderly care. The session will discuss sustainable food procurement policies aimed at:

  • Encouraging healthy eating
  • Minimising global warming
  • Promoting animal welfare and biodiversity
  • Reducing food waste and meat usage
  • Supporting local and regional food producers – thus safeguarding food security
Continue reading “Public food procurement – promoting population health, food security and ecosystem resilience.”

Hopeful Governance for Good Rural Food Economies and Environments

Conveners
Eifiona Thomas Lane, School of Natural Sciences, Bangor University
Lois Mansfield, Department of Science, Natural Resources and Outdoor Studies, University of Cumbria
Rebecca Jones, School of Natural Sciences, Bangor University

Much academic and activist time, energy and effort have been directed at changing local food economies and towards developing good food opportunities whether through community or business focussed interventions/projects. However recent research emphasis has been predominantly on the more urbanised food economy. Current alternative visions for many rural spaces have been challenged in terms of providing a clear route-map towards sustainable food futures that delivers local food access and livelihoods. This session will address questions of rural production and explores new supply chain possibilities. This will include research on good and hopeful governance in changing times as well as empirical studies of case studies of best practice from both upland and more productive agri-food /agri diversification and community developments e.g. Charters, Good Food projects, Food Councils and Food Hubs. Learning for building sustainable communities from across projects and networks and a range of scales and global contexts is a key aim of this action research focussed session. This two-part session especially welcomes practitioner and policy-based presentations and new researchers and aims to be as inclusive and interdisciplinary as possible.  

Urban Agriculture: Offering hope and health through horticulture

Session Convenors
Rebecca St. Clair (r.st.clair@mmu.ac.uk)
Dr Mike Hardman (m.hardman@salford.ac.uk)

The potential benefits of Urban Agriculture (UA) and in particular the relationship between food cultivation and health are gaining recognition across academia and policy (Horst, McClintock, & Hoey, 2017; Howe, Viljoen, & Bohn, 2005; Mulligan, Archbold, Baker, Elton, & Cole, 2018). In the UK, Social Prescribing (SP), a process that links patients to “nonmedical sources of support in the community and voluntary sector” (Pilkington, Loef, & Polley, 2017), is one mechanism by which the therapeutic benefits of UA are formally integrated into care. SP is currently experiencing a resurgence, with SP activities such as UA offering the potential to release capacity in general practice, implying cost savings for the NHS (NHS England, n.d.).

Continue reading “Urban Agriculture: Offering hope and health through horticulture”

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑