Wur Bradford

wurbradford2

Hi,

My name is Josie. I’m an artist from Bradford and today I was leading a discussion about food and community in an arts space in Kirkgate market.  The space is called WUR and it is an incredible project, an open stall plot, completely public space, with wonderful regulars as well as constant new faces.
wurbradford1Find out more about WUR here. I found that talking about food was a very tangible way to start talking about all kinds of other things from parenting to feminism to immigration. Next week we will be serving tasters of some of the recipes we chatted about and continuing conversations about the importance and complications of food within communities. We will also be talking about our plans to widen this project, making connections with the food stalls in the market as well as groups who are working with food in interesting ways in Bradford.
wurbradford3

I would like to invite you to join us 12-3 at WUR in Kirkgate market, Bradford (the stall opposite the Home From Home cafe, near the Westgate entrance). Thought this might be of interest and I am sure that you will have lots to share. Let me know if you have any questions.
Thanks,
Josie

 

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CFP: Critical Foodscapes: what does the future hold for urban gardening?

–A One Day Conference on July 7th 2016 at the University of Warwick, UK–
Confirmed Keynote: Dr Chiara Tornaghi (Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, UK)

Urban gardening has long promised radical alternatives to industrialised food production and the organisation of modern urban spaces. Yet despite recent increases in popularity and a conspicuous proliferation of its forms, urban gardening appears to have had minimal material influence on how we eat or how we live.

It is now time to ask what the future holds for urban gardening. What evidence is emerging of urban gardening’s social and environmental impacts? Can such forms really mitigate some of the major crises of our times – from mental illness and unemployment to the unsustainability of our food systems – or do they remain a fringe concern? And what changes – at the level of policy or grassroots mobilisation (or otherwise) – are required to maximise the impact and reach of future iterations of urban gardening?

This conference seeks to put critical – but constructive – pressure on some of the assumptions which underlie current theory and practice of urban gardening; as such, the conference organisers welcome papers encompassing a broad range of approaches and perspectives (whether research-, practitioner- or participant-orientated) considering the past, present and future of urban gardening. The conference will take the UK as its main focus but will accommodate international perspectives where possible. Papers might address, though not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Community gardens
  • Community supported agriculture
  • Urban and peri-urban food production
  • The cultural representation of urban gardens
  • Urban gardening and…

– local/national food policy
– grassroots activism
– food production
– mental health
– town planning
– education
– environmental sustainability
– economic sustainability
– emergency food aid

Please send 300 word abstracts and 100 word biographies to Dr C Maughan (IAS Early Career Fellow, University of Warwick) by Monday 11th April 2016christopher.maughan@warwick.ac.uk.

Following the conference, speakers and delegates are encouraged to submit papers to a proposed special issue with the journal, Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, subject to the peer-review process.

For more information, updates and to register see the conference website.
*For more information on Urban Gardening see recent article by Dr Maughan published by the American Anthropological Association

CFP: Young people and the ‘New Urban Agenda’: addressing key themes of Habitat III

University of Birmingham, 14th – 16th September 2016

This international two day conference will bring together academics working with children and youth to address key themes of Habitat III; a forum for debate, critical reflection and interdisciplinary discussion. Young people and the ‘New Urban Agenda’ at the University of Birmingham will set the research agenda for young lives in urban contexts.

On 17th – 20th October, 2016, in Quito, the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Development, Habitat III will take place setting plans in motion for ‘A New Urban Agenda’ for the 21st Century. Taking Habitat III’s key urban themes of i) mobility; ii) planning and design, iii) water and sanitation and iv) energy, the Young people and the ‘New Urban Agenda’ conference at the University of Birmingham will bring together researchers working in these fields, globally, to set the research agenda for young lives in urban contexts within the framework of Habitat III.

Key note speakers confirmed
Professor Louise Chawla, University of Colorado
Douglas Regan, Chief, Youth and Livelihood Unit, UN-Habitat

Call for papers
We invite papers which specifically address these four themes in relation to children and young people’s everyday lives. The papers will develop theory and showcase empirical evidence which will be used to prompt dialogue about young lives across contexts, communities and cultures to facilitate action and set the research direction in the age of ‘a new urban agenda.’

We invite papers which span global childhood experiences, addressing the themes of:

Theme 1: Mobility
– Children and young people’s everyday mobilities
– Children, young people and transport
– Children and young people as pedestrians
– Intergenerational and interdependent mobilities
– Children and young people affordable travel
– Children’s right to mobility

Theme 2: Planning and design
– Children’s experiences of public space
– Re-thinking public spaces with children and young people
– Inclusive cityscapes and city planning
– Absent planning: constraints and opportunities
– Participatory planning
– Children’s engagements with sustainable urban design
– Permanent and temporary, formal and informal urban spaces

Theme 3: Water and sanitation
– Young people and water
– Young people and sanitation
– Water, urban planning and sustainable drainage systems/Low Impact Development
– Water conservation and ecology
– Water management

Theme 4: Energy
– Young people and energy
– Young people and energy production
– Young people and energy consumption
– Energy solutions and young people’s perceptions and use
– Housing, energy and young people
– Cooking, energy and young people
– Young people and food
– Intergenerational perspectives of energy

Submit abstracts at: http://www.children-new-urban-agenda.com/

Other points to note:
i) Whilst there are four themes to this conference we appreciate that research will address cross-cutting issues, we are open to papers which address young people’s lives in the context of a nexus approach

ii) There is also space within the conference for a reflection on the aims and priorities of Habitat III, we encourage critical thinking in terms of the Urban Agenda for young people’s lives.

There is an optional third day of the conference dedicated to methodological approaches, providing a space for critical methodological discussion. There will be two workshop streams, one on participatory methodologies and the other on the use of technologies in social science research. We are asking for short 10 minute papers to address the two workshop streams:

1) Methodology workshop: Using participatory methodologies with children and young people (part funded by the ESRC Sharing Futures research project)

2) Methodology workshop: Use of technologies and apps in social science research with children and young people (part funded by the ESRC Map my Community research project)

This event is being organised by the School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Birmingham and part-funded across numerous research projects: New Urbanisms in India (ESRC); Sharing Futures (ESRC/Newton); (Re) Connect the Nexus (ESRC/FAPESP/Newton) and Map my Community (ESRC). This brings together shared visions and research agendas in thinking about young people in the ‘New Urban Agenda.’

CFP: Critical Foodscapes: what does the future hold for urban gardening?

A One Day Conference on July 7th 2016 at the University of Warwick, UK
Confirmed Keynote: Dr Chiara Tornaghi (Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, UK)

Urban gardening has long promised radical alternatives to industrialised food production and the organisation of modern urban spaces. Yet despite recent increases in popularity and a conspicuous proliferation of its forms, urban gardening appears to have had minimal material influence on how we eat or how we live.

It is now time to ask what the future holds for urban gardening. What evidence is emerging of urban gardening’s social and environmental impacts? Can such forms really mitigate some of the major crises of our times – from mental illness and unemployment to the unsustainability of our food systems – or do they remain a fringe concern? And what changes – at the level of policy or grassroots mobilisation (or otherwise) – are required to maximise the impact and reach of future iterations of urban gardening?

This conference seeks to put critical – but constructive – pressure on some of the assumptions which underlie current theory and practice of urban gardening; as such, the conference organisers welcome papers encompassing a broad range of approaches and perspectives (whether research-, practitioner- or participant-orientated) considering the past, present and future of urban gardening. The conference will take the UK as its main focus but will accommodate international perspectives where possible. Papers might address, though not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Community gardens
  • Community supported agriculture
  • Urban and peri-urban food production
  • The cultural representation of urban gardens
  • Urban gardening and…

– local/national food policy
– grassroots activism
– food production
– mental health
– town planning
– education
– environmental sustainability
– economic sustainability
– emergency food aid

Please send 300 word abstracts and 100 word biographies to Dr C Maughan (IAS Early Career Fellow, University of Warwick) by Monday 11th April 2016christopher.maughan@warwick.ac.uk.

Following the conference, speakers and delegates are encouraged to submit papers to a proposed special issue with the journal,Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, subject to the peer-review process.

For more information, updates and to register see the conference website.

CFP: A strategizing platform on urban political agroecology

Sponsor: Food Geographies Working Group, RGS
Session convenors : Barbara Van Dyck <barbaravdyck [at] gmail.com> and Chiara Tornaghi <chiara.tornaghi [at] coventry.ac.uk>

Abstract
One of the more recent and potentially progressive contributions to the field of agri-food knowledge production is how researchers and peasants seek to reconnect and transcend the narrow boundaries of conventional approaches and academic disciplines by being open to–and inclusive of–different actors, knowledges, experiences and opinions in the knowledge co-production process. Especially concerning the cooperation between researchers and peasants, political agroecology and dialogo de saberes have emerged as promising concepts in the construction of more just food systems. This raises important questions for our work as scholarly food activists in European urban contexts. How does political agroecology distinguish and inform knowledge production in urban contexts? Why would we talk about urban political agroecology at all? What characterizes processes of knowledge production, circulation and reproduction of urban political agroecology? Which actors and knowledges are mobilized? What role for scholar activists and action research in political urban agroecology? And what does this mean regarding strategies and tactics to move towards urban food systems in tune with the value and principles of agroecology and food sovereignty.

In this strategizing panel, urban (scholarly) activists from different collectives, cities and universities will jointly reflect on how to mutually support each other methodologically in our transdisciplinary work in different urban localities.

Please send a motivation of why you would want to participate in this strategizing platform in max 300 words to <barbaravdyck [at] gmail.com> and <chiara.tornaghi [at] coventry.ac.uk> by Wednesday the 17th of February.

CFP: Cities as Nodes in the Food Nexus: RGS-IBG AC16

Convenors: Dr Beth Perry and Dr Mike Hardman (University of Salford, UK), Dr Gareth Hysom (University of Cape Town, South Africa), Dr Peter Rundkvist (Business Region Gothenburg, Sweden), Stephen Agong (Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Univesity of Science and Technology (JOOUST), Kenya)
Session sponsored by the Food Geographies Working Group

Abstract:
These two interlinked sessions will explore how cities provide a unique crucible for exploring the food nexus. Starting with the Mistra Urban Futures network of cities in Sweden, South Africa, Kenya and the UK, the session will draw on live examples of food-based initiatives in each urban context to explore the dynamic interconnections in the urban food nexus. These include security, waste, justice, movements, governance, policy and practice and new themes will emerge throughout the session.

The first session will then focus on “Mapping the Urban Foodscape”. Each participant will present the landscape of food initiatives in their city via different forms of representation – this could involve posters, media, presentations etc. Each participant will be limited to 10 minutes. A discussion will be facilitated to identify key issues in the urban food nexus and select four themes for subsequent World Café discussion. The second session is called ‘Mapping the Urban Food Nexus’. A World Café discussion will take place around the four themes identified. Each table will be hosted by one of the Mistra Urban Futures city partners and then feedback issues which emerge from the discussions. A general reflection on ‘Cities as Nodes in the Food Nexus’ will take place, along with an identification of key priorities and opportunities for joint research-practice collaborations.

Overall, the sessions will provide an opportunity for examining how cities are themselves nodes in the food nexus and consider the combined role of research-practice relationships in addressing ‘wicked’ urban food issues. In the spirit of co-production, each attendee will have the opportunity to be an active participant and share and explore key themes from their own perspective. We therefore welcome expressions of interest to participate from academics and practitioners in different urban contexts in the Global South and North.

Please send a 250 word expression of interest to <b.perry [at]salford.ac.uk> and <m.hardman [at] salford.ac.uk> by 12th February. This should include full author details, a short description of the urban foodscape you wish to explore and examples of key initiatives, a short description of your research/practice interests and projects you have been involved in. We would also like to know how you would intend to use your 10 minutes to present the landscape of food initiatives in your chosen city.

Call for Submissions: Special Issue of Food, Culture and Society

Two more papers are sought to be part of a themed issue titled ‘Eating in the City’ for the journal Food, Culture and Society. The themed issue is interdisciplinary and contributions focusing on Asian cities or Asian migration in cities are welcomed. If you are interested to submit a paper, please contact Kelvin Low (kelvinlow [at] nus.edu.sg) and Elaine Ho (elaine.ho [at] nus.edu.sg) before 31 January 2016.

Timeline: first drafts by April 2016 with anticipated publication date in 2017

Food plays a central role in everyday social life. Taken together, food and foodways constitute the manner in which people relate to urban space and to one other. As cities transform, the ways that people eat and procure food also change, along with the sociocultural meanings of food itself. The multifarious ways in which food has shaped and continues to shape our lives socially, economically, politically, morally and nutritionally attest to the importance of studying gastronomic practices that connect people across regions, time, and social groups. The mobility of different communities and their accompanying foodways also impact upon how eating cultures in host societies are transformed and reorganized.

If the city is a site of gastronomic production, consumption, and exchange, how do such urban social spheres relate to shifting identities for social actors when foodways traverse both different cities and across borders? Is there a discernible urban ethos and subscription to modernizing forces that thereby influence how foodways are enacted, modified, and transformed?

By reflecting upon the role that food plays in human relations and across different spaces, this proposed special issue serves as a platform towards unravelling the enduring everyday culinary habits, rituals, creativity, and sensory experiences that are collectively used to nurture shared senses of cultural identity and economic livelihoods. In so doing, the special issue brings food studies into dialogue with key debates on diversity, conviviality, nostalgia, urbanization and modernization found in the disciplines of anthropology, cultural studies, history, geography, sociology and urban studies. Through connective, comparative, and historical perspectives, academics and urban stakeholders can together articulate a deeper meaning of food in cities so as to encourage stakeholders to consider its cultural significance as well as the economic centrality it represents to migrant communities and food enthusiasts.

The papers in the special issue deliberate upon three key lines of inquiry:

1. How do people perceive their positioning in the urban social order through their culinary practices, particularly amid the urban manifestations of global political-economic restructuring and sociocultural change?

2. How do the politics and sensescapes of gastronomy relate to the transformation and redevelopment of urban spaces? How is modern urban life shaped by immigration and migratory foodways?

3. Most pertinently, we ask, how are processes related to food and foodways, senses and urban change intertwined?

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