Sponsored sessions at RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2019

The call for papers on Food Geographies Working Group sponsored sessions is now open. Here is an overview of all the session we are supporting at this year's conference. You will find more details on each call for papers by clicking on the title of the session. Any inquiries should be directed to responsible session conveners.  
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Transforming Agricultural Learning: from troubled pasts to pedagogies of hope

Session Conveners
Hannah Pitt (PittH2@cardiff.ac.uk)
Alice Taherzadeh (TaherzadehA@cardiff.ac.uk)
Sustainable Places Research Institute, Cardiff University.

Any hope of sustainable food futures requires suitable systems of education and training to support agricultural production. Traditional state-led agricultural extension has received declining public investment, and been criticised for failing to address the needs of sustainable, alternative, localised agricultural practices. The agricultural knowledge base in Europe is also troubled by an aging farmer population, and lack of new entrants. However, community food and farming models, organisations, and unions are attracting a new generation interested in sustainable production, and enhancing their knowledge through horizontal or place-based learning. Innovative pedagogical approaches include popular and political education, those inspired by indigenous cultures, use of online platforms and open-source knowledge models. These sessions focus on actors hoping for sustainable, just, regenerative agricultural practices, and their learning practices. We are interested in case studies and theoretical perspectives which shed light on the challenges around learning in the context of agricultural production, and potential solutions.

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Public food procurement – promoting population health, food security and ecosystem resilience.

Convenor
Mark Stein markstein2010@live.co.uk

Public food procurement is a significant part of overall food consumption in many countries – buying food for schools nurseries, hospitals and elderly care. The session will discuss sustainable food procurement policies aimed at:

  • Encouraging healthy eating
  • Minimising global warming
  • Promoting animal welfare and biodiversity
  • Reducing food waste and meat usage
  • Supporting local and regional food producers – thus safeguarding food security
Continue reading “Public food procurement – promoting population health, food security and ecosystem resilience.”

Urban Agriculture: Offering hope and health through horticulture

Session Convenors
Rebecca St. Clair (r.st.clair@mmu.ac.uk)
Dr Mike Hardman (m.hardman@salford.ac.uk)

The potential benefits of Urban Agriculture (UA) and in particular the relationship between food cultivation and health are gaining recognition across academia and policy (Horst, McClintock, & Hoey, 2017; Howe, Viljoen, & Bohn, 2005; Mulligan, Archbold, Baker, Elton, & Cole, 2018). In the UK, Social Prescribing (SP), a process that links patients to “nonmedical sources of support in the community and voluntary sector” (Pilkington, Loef, & Polley, 2017), is one mechanism by which the therapeutic benefits of UA are formally integrated into care. SP is currently experiencing a resurgence, with SP activities such as UA offering the potential to release capacity in general practice, implying cost savings for the NHS (NHS England, n.d.).

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How to Make a Just Food Future: Hopeful collaborations transforming local food partnerships

Session Convenors
Megan Blake, University of Sheffield m.blake@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK
Agatha Herman, Cardiff University HermanA@cardiff.ac.uk
Rebecca Sandover, University of Exeter R.Sandover@exeter.ac.uk

Two RGS-IBG 2019 sessions will follow up themes explored in FGWG’s University of Sheffield conference that reflect on a range of issues related to ‘How to Make a Just Food Future’.  The linked sessions will bring together academics, practitioners and policymakers to reflect on the issues facing food systems, explore the potential for change to emerge from local, regional and trans-local food policy initiatives, investigate the role of the researcher in supporting and analysing these processes and setting out the limitations of these approaches.  A more integrative approach to food policy thinking is being progressed, it is argued, by city, regional and trans-local initiatives that enable policymakers to work with civil society actors on common issues (Betsill & Bulkeley 2007, Morgan & Sonnino 2010, Moragues-Faus & Carroll 2018). Globalised and trans-local networks of civil society food actors, such as Milan Urban Food Policy Pact (MUFPP) and the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, who work for more just and sustainable policies, are emerging as coherent voices for a reconfigured food system (Sonnino et al. 2016, Moragues-Faus & Morgan 2015).

Continue reading “How to Make a Just Food Future: Hopeful collaborations transforming local food partnerships”

Unsettling “ethical food” through mobility and migration

Convenor
Andrew Wilbur, Seoul National University. awilbur@snu.ac.kr

For the last two decades, ethical approaches to production, distribution and consumption of food have commanded a significant amount of attention for scholars across several disciplines. Much of this academic labour consists of defining, critiquing and refining the notion of what constitutes the ‘ethical’. This session seeks to draw on that scholarship while exploring how ethical concepts are complicated by spatial factors, particularly mobility and migration. How, in other words, does physical relocation affect otherwise fixed or stable notions of the ethical? What aspects of food ethics become, mutable, redefined or invigorated via relocation? This would apply to the production, distribution and consumption of food, and could involve such topics as:

  • Shifting ethical standards between city and countryside
  • Culturally contingent ethical standards vs. a Eurocentric “universalism”
  • Immigrants’ experiences of negotiating ethical standards in foreign countries
  • Immigrant-based food projects that seek to establish ethical practices
  • Gentrification and the transience of food ethics
  • Forced migration and disrupted ethical practices
  • Mobile populations and changing food taboos
  • Research strategies for working with temporary and/or transient populations

Inquiries should be addressed to the session-organiser.
Deadline for submitting abstracts is Tuesday 12th February 2019.

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