How to Make a Just Food Future: Alternative Foodways for a Changing World

University of Sheffield, UK, 8th-10th July 2019
Sponsored by the RGS-IBG Food Geographies Working Group (FGWG), the University of Sheffield and the University of Sheffield Research Institute for Sustainable Food Futures (SheFF).

Conference website:
https://justfoodfutures2019.wordpress.com

Over 2.5 days, the conference will include practitioner- academic- artist -governance panels, paper sessions, field visits, creative responses and more. We are very pleased to announce Professor Julian Agyeman, from Tufts University as our keynote speaker, plus interventions from Gary Stott (Incredible Edible) and Barbara Benish, internationally recognised artist, environmental campaigner and farmer. ‘How to Make a Just Food Future’ draws on FGWG members’ Participatory and Action Research connections with food partnerships local to Sheffield and from across the UK, as well as with UK wide bodies addressing current food issues, from food surplus redistribution to post-Brexit UK food production and much more. Drawing on ideas of social justice, care, political ecologies, translocality, intersectionality and the role of non-humans to offer timely and innovative interventions, it will develop spaces for collaboration and conversation in which to imagine socially just food futures and map out the personal and collective journeys that are needed to reach them.

Continue reading “How to Make a Just Food Future: Alternative Foodways for a Changing World”
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Workshop: Cultures, Behaviours and Histories of Agriculture, Food, and Nutrition, UKRI GCRF Collective Programme

08 March 2019, Wellcome Trust, 215 Euston Rd, Bloomsbury, London NW1 2BE  

This workshop is the first part of an interdisciplinary programme which will support the development of international research partnerships focussed on the intersection of culture, history, and society with all stages of the food systems chain, from production through to consumption and policy, in Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs).

The Programme aims to contribute to the development of the GCRF Food Systems challenge portfolio as a part of the UKRI GCRF Collective Programme. It is designed to be a part of a challenge-led, internationally collaborative and interdisciplinary programme delivered by UK Research and Innovation and steered by the GCRF Challenge Leaders. Whilst the AHRC is leading on this programme, it is intended to support cross-disciplinary working and applicants from all relevant disciplines are encouraged to participate.

Continue reading “Workshop: Cultures, Behaviours and Histories of Agriculture, Food, and Nutrition, UKRI GCRF Collective Programme”

Urban Agriculture and Food Collection

A Boost for Urban Agriculture and Food learning and Activism at the D. G. Ivey Library of New College, University of Toronto

The D. G. Ivey Library at New College, University of Toronto, has acquired a unique collection in the field of urban agriculture and food studies. The collection, made available through the generous donation of Joe Nasr, co-founder of the Urban Agriculture Network, comprises a wide range of materials focusing on urban agriculture, small-scale farming, food activism, and food-related policies around the world. It includes rare and difficult-to-find books, magazines, journals, personal papers, policy documents, and reports by governments and non-governmental organizations, most of them published between 1970 and 1999. The collection is named in honor (and includes papers and correspondence) of the late Jac Smit – an early advocate of urban agriculture – acquired while working around the world for agencies such as the International Rescue Committee and the United Nations Development Program (for more information about Jac Smit, please visit http://www.jacsmit.com/).

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The role of cities in delivering food security and sustainability outcomes: a social-ecological perspective

This workshop aims to co-produce new knowledge around how different cities tackle sustainability and food security challenges by analysing their distinct social-ecological configurations and their diverse food policies and governance systems. This participative space will include international experts and practitioners and will be restricted to 20 participants. This workshop is linked to the event “The new urban food agenda”. Continue reading “The role of cities in delivering food security and sustainability outcomes: a social-ecological perspective”

‘What might an ‘alternative’, agroecological post-Brexit foodscape look like? Exploring opportunities, challenges, evidence and ambition’

RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, 28-31 August 2018, Cardiff, UK.

Sponsored by the Food Geographies Working Group (FGWG)

Session convenors:
Luke Owen, Alex Franklin, Donna Udall (Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience (CAWR), Coventry University)

Since the 2016 referendum outcome to leave the European Union, food and agri-food discussions more broadly have become an important lens for arguments about the future prosperity and sustainability of the UK’s socio-economic and ecological landscape. There have been numerous publications that attempt to spell out recommendations for post-Brexit agricultural policies, yet these are still somewhat ascent rather than comprehensive. As such, there is a need for further multistakeholder dialogue about what a post-Brexit foodscape will – or should – ‘look like’, how it might function, and for whom. Indeed, Brexit has created an opportunity for otherwise peripheral, ‘alternative’ agri-food praxis and policies connected to agroecology and food sovereignty to be more widely understood, and for possibilities of a more sustainable, multi-functional foodscape to be realised following Brexit.

We invite contributions that address the current ‘happenings’ between Brexit and agri-food systems, with a particular interest in ‘alternative’ visions and practices surrounding agroecology and food sovereignty. Submissions with a focus on food policy, transition theory, (community) self-organisation and governance are especially welcome. We seek empirical work to help ground often speculative scenarios and to identify the risks and opportunities of incorporating agroecological praxis into a more sustainable, resilient and successful post-Brexit foodscape.

Full details on the RGS-IBG AC 2018 conference can be found here and information about the RGS-IBG FGWG can be found here.

Enquiries and abstract submission of 250 words (together with a title, up to five keywords and author(s) affiliation and contact details) should be sent to the convenors: Luke Owen (Luke.owen@coventry.ac.uk), Alex Franklin (Alex.Franklin@coventry.ac.uk) and Donna Udall (Donna.udall@coventry.ac.uk) by 9th of February 2018.

CFP: Critical Foodscapes: what does the future hold for urban gardening?

A One Day Conference on July 7th 2016 at the University of Warwick, UK
Confirmed Keynote: Dr Chiara Tornaghi (Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, UK)

Urban gardening has long promised radical alternatives to industrialised food production and the organisation of modern urban spaces. Yet despite recent increases in popularity and a conspicuous proliferation of its forms, urban gardening appears to have had minimal material influence on how we eat or how we live.

It is now time to ask what the future holds for urban gardening. What evidence is emerging of urban gardening’s social and environmental impacts? Can such forms really mitigate some of the major crises of our times – from mental illness and unemployment to the unsustainability of our food systems – or do they remain a fringe concern? And what changes – at the level of policy or grassroots mobilisation (or otherwise) – are required to maximise the impact and reach of future iterations of urban gardening?

This conference seeks to put critical – but constructive – pressure on some of the assumptions which underlie current theory and practice of urban gardening; as such, the conference organisers welcome papers encompassing a broad range of approaches and perspectives (whether research-, practitioner- or participant-orientated) considering the past, present and future of urban gardening. The conference will take the UK as its main focus but will accommodate international perspectives where possible. Papers might address, though not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Community gardens
  • Community supported agriculture
  • Urban and peri-urban food production
  • The cultural representation of urban gardens
  • Urban gardening and…

– local/national food policy
– grassroots activism
– food production
– mental health
– town planning
– education
– environmental sustainability
– economic sustainability
– emergency food aid

Please send 300 word abstracts and 100 word biographies to Dr C Maughan (IAS Early Career Fellow, University of Warwick) by Monday 11th April 2016christopher.maughan@warwick.ac.uk.

Following the conference, speakers and delegates are encouraged to submit papers to a proposed special issue with the journal,Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, subject to the peer-review process.

For more information, updates and to register see the conference website.

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