How to Make a Just Food Future: Alternative Foodways for a Changing World

University of Sheffield, UK, 8th-10th July 2019
Sponsored by the RGS-IBG Food Geographies Working Group (FGWG), the University of Sheffield and the University of Sheffield Research Institute for Sustainable Food Futures (SheFF).

Conference website:
https://justfoodfutures2019.wordpress.com

Over 2.5 days, the conference will include practitioner- academic- artist -governance panels, paper sessions, field visits, creative responses and more. We are very pleased to announce Professor Julian Agyeman, from Tufts University as our keynote speaker, plus interventions from Gary Stott (Incredible Edible) and Barbara Benish, internationally recognised artist, environmental campaigner and farmer. ‘How to Make a Just Food Future’ draws on FGWG members’ Participatory and Action Research connections with food partnerships local to Sheffield and from across the UK, as well as with UK wide bodies addressing current food issues, from food surplus redistribution to post-Brexit UK food production and much more. Drawing on ideas of social justice, care, political ecologies, translocality, intersectionality and the role of non-humans to offer timely and innovative interventions, it will develop spaces for collaboration and conversation in which to imagine socially just food futures and map out the personal and collective journeys that are needed to reach them.

Continue reading “How to Make a Just Food Future: Alternative Foodways for a Changing World”
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Call for abstracts for a book chapter: ‘Food for Degrowth: Principles, Case Studies and Challenges’

How can we produce, consume and preserve food for degrowth in urban settings? To what extent is urban food sufficiency and resilience possible? How can we redesign food provisioning in cities and towns to overcome current limitations?

Continue reading “Call for abstracts for a book chapter: ‘Food for Degrowth: Principles, Case Studies and Challenges’”

Enormous amounts of food are wasted during manufacturing – here’s where it occurs

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Megan BlakeUniversity of Sheffield

 

The volume of edible food that is wasted is staggering. In 2017, the UN estimated that almost a third of all food that is produced is discarded. Edible food makes up approximately 1.3 gigatonnes of this (one gigatonne is a billion tonnes). For comparison, one tonne of wasted food is about the equivalent of 127 large plastic bin bags. This not only represents a phenomenal loss in terms of food that could feed people, but also a loss in resources such as water, labour power, soil nutrients, transportation energy and so forth.  Continue reading

Call for papers on “Community self-organisation and landscapes of food justice and sustainability”

Call for papers, RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, 28-31 August 2018 in Cardiff, UK.

We invite abstract submissions from established and as well as early stage and postgraduate researchers for the FGWG sponsored session “Community self-organisation and landscapes of food justice and sustainability” at the RGS with IBG Annual International Conference, which will take place from 28 to 31 August 2018 in Cardiff, UK.

Session convenors: Moya Kneafsey, Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University & Mustafa Hasanov, University of Groningen

This session considers the role of community self-organisation in relation to new landscapes of food justice and sustainability. Recent years have seen a flourishing of community-led initiatives aiming to create food systems which deliver nourishing food whilst upholding principles such as care for planetary resources, fair livelihoods for producers, food rights for consumers and compassion for animals. Community self-organisation suggests various types of mobilisation, across multiple scales and time horizons, involving a diversity of actors and sometimes interplay with local authorities. Yet many critical questions remain. For example, what do self-organising communities look like, what conditions are needed for them to flourish in different contexts and what is self-organising after all? What is the outlook for community self-organisation in times of austerity and increased social tension? Are self-organising communities always socially inclusive, sustainable, and resilient? What is the role of new technologies in enabling community self-organisation? What is the role of food scholars in relation to community self-organisation? To what extent does – or can –  community self-organisation contribute to large-scale transitions towards sustainable and resilient foodscapes? We welcome papers addressing these and related questions in a range of landscapes, including urban, rural, post-industrial, post-colonial, colonial, historical and contemporary.

Full details on the RGS-IBG AC 2018 conference can be found here and information about the RGS-IBG FGWG can be found here.

Enquiries and abstract submission (together with a title, up to five keywords and author(s) affiliation and contact details) should be sent to Moya Kneafsey (m.kneafsey@coventry.ac.uk and Mustafa Hasanov (m.h.hasanov@rug.nl) by 9th of February 2018.

The final decision on whether or not papers have been accepted will follow on Friday 23rd February 2018.

 

‘How can we link people to healthy local food?’ #WorldEnvironmentDay special

June 5th is Wolrd Environment Day. For the occasion, we are featuring #WorldEnvironmentDay specials on our blog in order to raise awareness on the role of food in environmental thinking in dedicated blog posts. In this blog post, we share insights from prof. Stewart Barr (University of Exeter) during the ‘Feeding Exeter’ workshop on April 22nd, 2017 and organized by Exeter Food Network (EFN) Continue reading “‘How can we link people to healthy local food?’ #WorldEnvironmentDay special”

‘Why SURPLUS food is important’ #WorldEnvironmentDay special

Juen 5th is Wolrd Environment Day. For the occasion, we are featuring #WorldEnvironmentDay specials on our blog in order to raise awareness on the role of food in environmental thinking in dedicated blog posts. The first blog, by Dr. Megan Blake (University of Sheffield), is on the importance of surplus food for feeding vulnerable people.

There have been a number of arguments in the press and on social media arguing that the use of surplus food to feed food insecure people is at best only a short-term solution and at worst harmful (e.g., Caraher 2017).  I would agree that the hunger that is caused by poverty is not only not being addressed by the UK government (see Blake 2015, and a more recent update of the article published by GMPA) but in some cases is being enhanced by current government policy (e.g., a benefits system that has built in delays, draconian sanctions, programme cuts that impact on the most vulnerable). In reading the argument, however, a number of issues stand out as needing further clarification and interrogation.  Firstly, there is a lack of understanding about food surplus in terms of what it is.  Secondly, there is misconception about how food surplus becomes food for bellies as it travels through the charity sector. Thirdly, there is an overly narrow understanding of the value of surplus food both for charities and those whom they support. These issues are explored in this blog post Continue reading “‘Why SURPLUS food is important’ #WorldEnvironmentDay special”

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