Wur Bradford

wurbradford2

Hi,

My name is Josie. I’m an artist from Bradford and today I was leading a discussion about food and community in an arts space in Kirkgate market.  The space is called WUR and it is an incredible project, an open stall plot, completely public space, with wonderful regulars as well as constant new faces.
wurbradford1Find out more about WUR here. I found that talking about food was a very tangible way to start talking about all kinds of other things from parenting to feminism to immigration. Next week we will be serving tasters of some of the recipes we chatted about and continuing conversations about the importance and complications of food within communities. We will also be talking about our plans to widen this project, making connections with the food stalls in the market as well as groups who are working with food in interesting ways in Bradford.
wurbradford3

I would like to invite you to join us 12-3 at WUR in Kirkgate market, Bradford (the stall opposite the Home From Home cafe, near the Westgate entrance). Thought this might be of interest and I am sure that you will have lots to share. Let me know if you have any questions.
Thanks,
Josie

 

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CFP: Critical Foodscapes: what does the future hold for urban gardening?

–A One Day Conference on July 7th 2016 at the University of Warwick, UK–
Confirmed Keynote: Dr Chiara Tornaghi (Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, UK)

Urban gardening has long promised radical alternatives to industrialised food production and the organisation of modern urban spaces. Yet despite recent increases in popularity and a conspicuous proliferation of its forms, urban gardening appears to have had minimal material influence on how we eat or how we live.

It is now time to ask what the future holds for urban gardening. What evidence is emerging of urban gardening’s social and environmental impacts? Can such forms really mitigate some of the major crises of our times – from mental illness and unemployment to the unsustainability of our food systems – or do they remain a fringe concern? And what changes – at the level of policy or grassroots mobilisation (or otherwise) – are required to maximise the impact and reach of future iterations of urban gardening?

This conference seeks to put critical – but constructive – pressure on some of the assumptions which underlie current theory and practice of urban gardening; as such, the conference organisers welcome papers encompassing a broad range of approaches and perspectives (whether research-, practitioner- or participant-orientated) considering the past, present and future of urban gardening. The conference will take the UK as its main focus but will accommodate international perspectives where possible. Papers might address, though not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Community gardens
  • Community supported agriculture
  • Urban and peri-urban food production
  • The cultural representation of urban gardens
  • Urban gardening and…

– local/national food policy
– grassroots activism
– food production
– mental health
– town planning
– education
– environmental sustainability
– economic sustainability
– emergency food aid

Please send 300 word abstracts and 100 word biographies to Dr C Maughan (IAS Early Career Fellow, University of Warwick) by Monday 11th April 2016christopher.maughan@warwick.ac.uk.

Following the conference, speakers and delegates are encouraged to submit papers to a proposed special issue with the journal, Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, subject to the peer-review process.

For more information, updates and to register see the conference website.
*For more information on Urban Gardening see recent article by Dr Maughan published by the American Anthropological Association

CFP: Critical Foodscapes: what does the future hold for urban gardening?

A One Day Conference on July 7th 2016 at the University of Warwick, UK
Confirmed Keynote: Dr Chiara Tornaghi (Centre for Agroecology, Water and Resilience, Coventry University, UK)

Urban gardening has long promised radical alternatives to industrialised food production and the organisation of modern urban spaces. Yet despite recent increases in popularity and a conspicuous proliferation of its forms, urban gardening appears to have had minimal material influence on how we eat or how we live.

It is now time to ask what the future holds for urban gardening. What evidence is emerging of urban gardening’s social and environmental impacts? Can such forms really mitigate some of the major crises of our times – from mental illness and unemployment to the unsustainability of our food systems – or do they remain a fringe concern? And what changes – at the level of policy or grassroots mobilisation (or otherwise) – are required to maximise the impact and reach of future iterations of urban gardening?

This conference seeks to put critical – but constructive – pressure on some of the assumptions which underlie current theory and practice of urban gardening; as such, the conference organisers welcome papers encompassing a broad range of approaches and perspectives (whether research-, practitioner- or participant-orientated) considering the past, present and future of urban gardening. The conference will take the UK as its main focus but will accommodate international perspectives where possible. Papers might address, though not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Community gardens
  • Community supported agriculture
  • Urban and peri-urban food production
  • The cultural representation of urban gardens
  • Urban gardening and…

– local/national food policy
– grassroots activism
– food production
– mental health
– town planning
– education
– environmental sustainability
– economic sustainability
– emergency food aid

Please send 300 word abstracts and 100 word biographies to Dr C Maughan (IAS Early Career Fellow, University of Warwick) by Monday 11th April 2016christopher.maughan@warwick.ac.uk.

Following the conference, speakers and delegates are encouraged to submit papers to a proposed special issue with the journal,Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, subject to the peer-review process.

For more information, updates and to register see the conference website.

CFP: Organising Food Access: Community Food, Governance and Place: RGS-IBG AC16

Convenors: Dr Mags Adams & Dr Rebecca Sandover 
Session sponsored by the Food Geographies Working Group

The increase of community food projects based in the UK and globally affords the opportunity for academics to explore the emergent governance of these projects. Whilst ad hoc place-based groups emerge in specific locales, the spread of formalised community food focused projects with national and global reach also impact localised communities. These differing spheres of operation may affect the potential of these projects to impact policy and praxis and their potential to disseminate food knowledge. Therefore this session seeks to explore the role of community food projects as catalysts in generating food knowledge and in shaping access to food governance. In what way do the differing levels of formalised structures and reach change how community food projects operate? We welcome perspectives that-

• Critically examine community food projects as actants for enabling food justice
• How the governance of local food projects affect their engagements with local communities and shaping policy
• Examine the tensions between food knowledge diffusion and the differing modes of organisation of community food projects
• Critically examine the role of place itself as a melting pot of opportunities for access to food and generating food knowledge
• Question the extent to which community food projects transcend place boundaries to generate wider impacts and cross the seeming gulf of urban vs rural food research
• Examine the modes by which academics research community food projects and the role of the practitioner-researcher
• Explore community food projects and web 2.0: the role of online spaces in assisting the spread of food projects

Proposals for papers, with a title, a short abstract of 250 words and your full contact details, should be sent to one of the co-organisers by Wednesday 17th February – Dr Mags Adams <M.Adams [at] salford.ac.uk> & Dr Rebecca Sandover <rebeccasandover [at] gmail.com>

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