How to Make a Just Food Future: Alternative Foodways for a Changing World

University of Sheffield, UK, 8th-10th July 2019
Sponsored by the RGS-IBG Food Geographies Working Group (FGWG), the University of Sheffield and the University of Sheffield Research Institute for Sustainable Food Futures (SheFF).

Conference website:
https://justfoodfutures2019.wordpress.com

Over 2.5 days, the conference will include practitioner- academic- artist -governance panels, paper sessions, field visits, creative responses and more. We are very pleased to announce Professor Julian Agyeman, from Tufts University as our keynote speaker, plus interventions from Gary Stott (Incredible Edible) and Barbara Benish, internationally recognised artist, environmental campaigner and farmer. ‘How to Make a Just Food Future’ draws on FGWG members’ Participatory and Action Research connections with food partnerships local to Sheffield and from across the UK, as well as with UK wide bodies addressing current food issues, from food surplus redistribution to post-Brexit UK food production and much more. Drawing on ideas of social justice, care, political ecologies, translocality, intersectionality and the role of non-humans to offer timely and innovative interventions, it will develop spaces for collaboration and conversation in which to imagine socially just food futures and map out the personal and collective journeys that are needed to reach them.

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CFP—You Are What You Post: Food and Instagram

Call for papers — You Are What You Post: Food and Instagram

Emily Contois

In the beginning, critics pegged Instagram as the site for polaroid-shaped pictures of brunch and babies. Its presumedwhiteness, feminization, and superficial consumerism have been slow to draw sustained scholarly attention compared with Facebook and Twitter, despite the fact that by mid-2018, the image-based social media platform had topped one billion users worldwide. Now an extensive and heterogeneous visual ecosystem, Instagram’s unique relations between food and media—and the broader cultural significance of these dynamics—warrant critical scrutiny.

How does the “social photography” (Manovich 2014) of Instagram mediate ideas about food, eating, health, and nutrition? How does food intersect with diverse performances of identity, including celebrity, in the digital vernacular of posting photos with significant frequency? Considering more than 70% of American businesses are estimated to engage with the platform, how does the visual economy of Instagram participate in and reshape food and restaurant brand development and marketing? How does Instagram’s rapid…

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Workshop: Cultures, Behaviours and Histories of Agriculture, Food, and Nutrition, UKRI GCRF Collective Programme

08 March 2019, Wellcome Trust, 215 Euston Rd, Bloomsbury, London NW1 2BE  

This workshop is the first part of an interdisciplinary programme which will support the development of international research partnerships focussed on the intersection of culture, history, and society with all stages of the food systems chain, from production through to consumption and policy, in Lower and Middle Income Countries (LMICs).

The Programme aims to contribute to the development of the GCRF Food Systems challenge portfolio as a part of the UKRI GCRF Collective Programme. It is designed to be a part of a challenge-led, internationally collaborative and interdisciplinary programme delivered by UK Research and Innovation and steered by the GCRF Challenge Leaders. Whilst the AHRC is leading on this programme, it is intended to support cross-disciplinary working and applicants from all relevant disciplines are encouraged to participate.

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Is food sovereignty a feminist practice? Interrogating the gender dimensions of food sovereignty

Convenors
Annette Aurélie Desmarais, Canada Research Chair in Human Rights, Social Justice and Food Sovereignty, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. (Annette.desmarais@umanitoba.ca)
Rita Calvário, Center of Social Studies, University of Coimbra, Portugal. (ritamcalvario@gmail.com)

Gender equality/equity is a critical element of the theory, discourse and practice of food sovereignty. Indeed, in this approach “women’s rights are non-negotiable” (Patel 2009). Yet, there is a considerable research gap on the gendered dimensions of food sovereignty (Agarwal 2014; Masson et al. 2017). This session will interrogate the role of food sovereignty in transforming social relations by analyzing if and how food sovereignty — as an on-going process of food system transformation (Schiavoni 2017) and feminist practice (Masson et al. 2017) — helps creates a “deep egalitarianism” (Menser 2008) that confronts unequal power relations, structures and processes, based on sex, race, patriarchy and class.

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Sponsored sessions at RGS-IBG Annual Conference 2019

The call for papers on Food Geographies Working Group sponsored sessions is now open. Here is an overview of all the session we are supporting at this year's conference. You will find more details on each call for papers by clicking on the title of the session. Any inquiries should be directed to responsible session conveners.  
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Urban Agriculture: Offering hope and health through horticulture

Session Convenors
Rebecca St. Clair (r.st.clair@mmu.ac.uk)
Dr Mike Hardman (m.hardman@salford.ac.uk)

The potential benefits of Urban Agriculture (UA) and in particular the relationship between food cultivation and health are gaining recognition across academia and policy (Horst, McClintock, & Hoey, 2017; Howe, Viljoen, & Bohn, 2005; Mulligan, Archbold, Baker, Elton, & Cole, 2018). In the UK, Social Prescribing (SP), a process that links patients to “nonmedical sources of support in the community and voluntary sector” (Pilkington, Loef, & Polley, 2017), is one mechanism by which the therapeutic benefits of UA are formally integrated into care. SP is currently experiencing a resurgence, with SP activities such as UA offering the potential to release capacity in general practice, implying cost savings for the NHS (NHS England, n.d.).

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How to Make a Just Food Future: Hopeful collaborations transforming local food partnerships

Session Convenors
Megan Blake, University of Sheffield m.blake@SHEFFIELD.AC.UK
Agatha Herman, Cardiff University HermanA@cardiff.ac.uk
Rebecca Sandover, University of Exeter R.Sandover@exeter.ac.uk

Two RGS-IBG 2019 sessions will follow up themes explored in FGWG’s University of Sheffield conference that reflect on a range of issues related to ‘How to Make a Just Food Future’.  The linked sessions will bring together academics, practitioners and policymakers to reflect on the issues facing food systems, explore the potential for change to emerge from local, regional and trans-local food policy initiatives, investigate the role of the researcher in supporting and analysing these processes and setting out the limitations of these approaches.  A more integrative approach to food policy thinking is being progressed, it is argued, by city, regional and trans-local initiatives that enable policymakers to work with civil society actors on common issues (Betsill & Bulkeley 2007, Morgan & Sonnino 2010, Moragues-Faus & Carroll 2018). Globalised and trans-local networks of civil society food actors, such as Milan Urban Food Policy Pact (MUFPP) and the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, who work for more just and sustainable policies, are emerging as coherent voices for a reconfigured food system (Sonnino et al. 2016, Moragues-Faus & Morgan 2015).

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Food Geographies session proposals for RGS-IBG AC 2019

The Food Geographies Working Group (FGWG) invites session proposals for the RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2019 being held in London from Wednesday 28th August to Friday 30th August 2019. Professor Hester Parr will chair the conference with the theme of‘geographies of trouble / geographies of hope’.  The deadline for session proposals is Monday 7th January 2019. Proposals for, or  questions about, FGWG sponsored sessions should be sent to Dr Michael Hardman via m.hardman [at] salford.ac.uk

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