Lessons for Working Collaboratively — How to make a just food future: alternative foodways for a changing world

Agatha Herman reflects on the closing workshop of the How to make a just food future: alternative foodways for a changing world conference sponsored by University of Sheffield Sustainable Food Futures, The RGS-IBG Food Geographies Working Group, and The Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers. 

In this final workshop of the How to Make a Just Food Future conference, participants (appropriately) worked collaboratively to identify common themes in their experiences of collaborative working. This started through paired discussions around past frustrations, successes, challenges and pleasures, which resulted in key statements around these being written on post-its. These were stuck to [click on link to read more]

Lessons for Working Collaboratively — HOW TO MAKE A JUST FOOD FUTURE: alternative foodways for a changing world
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Urban Agriculture and Food Collection

A Boost for Urban Agriculture and Food learning and Activism at the D. G. Ivey Library of New College, University of Toronto

The D. G. Ivey Library at New College, University of Toronto, has acquired a unique collection in the field of urban agriculture and food studies. The collection, made available through the generous donation of Joe Nasr, co-founder of the Urban Agriculture Network, comprises a wide range of materials focusing on urban agriculture, small-scale farming, food activism, and food-related policies around the world. It includes rare and difficult-to-find books, magazines, journals, personal papers, policy documents, and reports by governments and non-governmental organizations, most of them published between 1970 and 1999. The collection is named in honor (and includes papers and correspondence) of the late Jac Smit – an early advocate of urban agriculture – acquired while working around the world for agencies such as the International Rescue Committee and the United Nations Development Program (for more information about Jac Smit, please visit http://www.jacsmit.com/).

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Enormous amounts of food are wasted during manufacturing – here’s where it occurs

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Megan BlakeUniversity of Sheffield

 

The volume of edible food that is wasted is staggering. In 2017, the UN estimated that almost a third of all food that is produced is discarded. Edible food makes up approximately 1.3 gigatonnes of this (one gigatonne is a billion tonnes). For comparison, one tonne of wasted food is about the equivalent of 127 large plastic bin bags. This not only represents a phenomenal loss in terms of food that could feed people, but also a loss in resources such as water, labour power, soil nutrients, transportation energy and so forth.  Continue reading

Reflections on the Place-Based Food Systems Conference 2018: Making the Case, Making It Happen

by Ciska Ulug

Last week (August 9-10th, 2018), I attended the Place-Based Food Systems: Making the Case, Making It Happen conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. While revamping the food system tends to focus more on “local” and “sustainable”, the highlighting “place-based” acknowledges the importance of our food systems role in the broader movement in creating a more sustainable society. Continue reading “Reflections on the Place-Based Food Systems Conference 2018: Making the Case, Making It Happen”

The role of cities in delivering food security and sustainability outcomes: a social-ecological perspective

This workshop aims to co-produce new knowledge around how different cities tackle sustainability and food security challenges by analysing their distinct social-ecological configurations and their diverse food policies and governance systems. This participative space will include international experts and practitioners and will be restricted to 20 participants. This workshop is linked to the event “The new urban food agenda”. Continue reading “The role of cities in delivering food security and sustainability outcomes: a social-ecological perspective”

Report on FGWG Writing retreat in Bangor (Gwynedd)

by  Mustafa Hasanov, Imogen Bellwood Howard &  Rebecca Sandover

Imagine the following: Tuesday evening, moody Welsh weather, plates on the table are empty, the glasses half full, and a bunch of food geographers are writing random phrases on small pieces of paper. Why, you ask, as well you should, would they do that? The fact is, this was the warming-up exercise for the first writing retreat organized by the FGWG of RGS-IBG. Our hideaway was in Bangor (Gwynedd) and for one day (and a little bit more) we shared our thoughts and knowledge on matters of academic writing.

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