Unsettling “ethical food” through mobility and migration

Convenor
Andrew Wilbur, Seoul National University. awilbur@snu.ac.kr

For the last two decades, ethical approaches to production, distribution and consumption of food have commanded a significant amount of attention for scholars across several disciplines. Much of this academic labour consists of defining, critiquing and refining the notion of what constitutes the ‘ethical’. This session seeks to draw on that scholarship while exploring how ethical concepts are complicated by spatial factors, particularly mobility and migration. How, in other words, does physical relocation affect otherwise fixed or stable notions of the ethical? What aspects of food ethics become, mutable, redefined or invigorated via relocation? This would apply to the production, distribution and consumption of food, and could involve such topics as:

  • Shifting ethical standards between city and countryside
  • Culturally contingent ethical standards vs. a Eurocentric “universalism”
  • Immigrants’ experiences of negotiating ethical standards in foreign countries
  • Immigrant-based food projects that seek to establish ethical practices
  • Gentrification and the transience of food ethics
  • Forced migration and disrupted ethical practices
  • Mobile populations and changing food taboos
  • Research strategies for working with temporary and/or transient populations

Inquiries should be addressed to the session-organiser.
Deadline for submitting abstracts is Tuesday 12th February 2019.

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