CALL FOR PAPERS – SPECIAL ISSUE: Eating in the Anthropocene: Learning the practice and ethics of food politics

This special issue calls into question: How is learning about/of food relevant to transformative ethical practice? How might we approach multifaceted food issues and political projects (e.g., animal ethics and environmental ethics, to name a couple) through different ways of learning and knowing about food, and different food practices? How might we understand the world in ways that can engender transgression or difference as a counterpolitics to particular food behaviours in the production, distribution and consumption of food? Are there practices of teaching that catalyse a different ethics and/or practice of food? In what ways can new food knowledge transform societies, subjectivities, and ways of organizing? Continue reading

RGS-IBG ‘Food Geography Working Group’ Dissertation Prize

The FGWG is pleased to offer a 1st place Undergraduate Dissertation Prize of £ 100 and a 2nd place of £ 50. The prize is open to any currently registered undergraduate student at a UK university and will be awarded to the dissertations that exhibit the best overall contributions to the wide range of issues relating to Food Geographies. The dissertation should be of first class standard and be submitted by the students Department (Head or nominated representative) and with the student’s knowledge.

We accept submissions in electronic format only. Please send a copy to the FGWG Secretary,  Rebecca Sandover (rebeccasandover [at] gmail.com) before Friday 7th of July 2017.

Please include a contact email address for the student (post graduation if necessary).

  • Please note that we can only accept one entry from any department and nominated dissertations!
  • Please note that nominated dissertations should not be submitted for consideration for any other RGS-IBG prizes. 

dissertation prize

For more information on the RGS-IBG Food Geographies Working Groups group, check our info page:

https://foodgeographies.wordpress.com/about/

or join our Community:

  • Become a RGS-IBG FGWG Member here
  • Email List:  link to JISCMail hosted email list here
  • Twitter: @foodgeog

 

 

‘How can we link people to healthy local food?’ #WorldEnvironmentDay special

June 5th is Wolrd Environment Day. For the occasion, we are featuring #WorldEnvironmentDay specials on our blog in order to raise awareness on the role of food in environmental thinking in dedicated blog posts. In this blog post, we share insights from prof. Stewart Barr (University of Exeter) during the ‘Feeding Exeter’ workshop on April 22nd, 2017 and organized by Exeter Food Network (EFN) Continue reading

‘Why SURPLUS food is important’ #WorldEnvironmentDay special

Juen 5th is Wolrd Environment Day. For the occasion, we are featuring #WorldEnvironmentDay specials on our blog in order to raise awareness on the role of food in environmental thinking in dedicated blog posts. The first blog, by Dr. Megan Blake (University of Sheffield), is on the importance of surplus food for feeding vulnerable people.

There have been a number of arguments in the press and on social media arguing that the use of surplus food to feed food insecure people is at best only a short-term solution and at worst harmful (e.g., Caraher 2017).  I would agree that the hunger that is caused by poverty is not only not being addressed by the UK government (see Blake 2015, and a more recent update of the article published by GMPA) but in some cases is being enhanced by current government policy (e.g., a benefits system that has built in delays, draconian sanctions, programme cuts that impact on the most vulnerable). In reading the argument, however, a number of issues stand out as needing further clarification and interrogation.  Firstly, there is a lack of understanding about food surplus in terms of what it is.  Secondly, there is misconception about how food surplus becomes food for bellies as it travels through the charity sector. Thirdly, there is an overly narrow understanding of the value of surplus food both for charities and those whom they support. These issues are explored in this blog post Continue reading

Workshop: ‘Food, Justice and Food Justice for All’, University of Birmingham at Edgbaston.

The food systems of the globe are undergoing upheaval as are the natural and political systems of the planet that supports them. It is reflected in the concerns shown across the wide variety of organisations which make up the Food Movements of Britain.

In order to register your interest in attending, please complete the form below. Places are limited and we will operate on a first come first served basis mindful of the need to keep the space diverse. We will close this form on Monday June 12th at midnight.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeKo73-lY435m1LSltPnDM8tjAOYW9husmbd7f0qMah1i5Isw/viewform?usp=sf_link

Continue reading